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Techbits

Greg
Techbits are a brain child of Greg Hess, who initially started them on the Discreet Forum, then moved them here to a permanent home; they are gathered, (chewed up) and processed by Greg Hess and Thomas Bruno, an all around good guys, hardware experts and 3DLuVr staff/contributing authors.

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#1436| source: http://www.rojakpot.com by maximum3d on Sun Nov 16 2003 
The Hot Flashing Guide
Adrian's Rojak Pot let us know they have posted Hot Flashing Guide. Hot flashing is basically the same as a plain jane BIOS flash - you use a BIOS flash utility to flash a BIOS image into the Flash ROM. However, there is a twist to it. Hot flashing requires you to swap BIOS chips while the system is running! That's what the word 'hot' in hot flashing means - you swap the BIOS chip when your system is 'hot'.
#1435| source: http://www.doom9.org by maximum3d on Sun Nov 16 2003 
Media Player Classic, v6.4.6.8
The latest version of Media Player Classic, v6.4.6.8
#1434| source: http://www.macecraft.com by maximum3d on Sun Nov 16 2003 
RegSupreme 1.1.0.23
RegSupreme is a new generation standalone registry cleaner. It not yet another registry cleaner wrapped to a new eye candy but a real innovation, it reshapes the whole concept of registry cleaning.
#1433| source: http://money.cnn.com/ by maximum3d on Sat Nov 15 2003 
IBM builds new supercomputer
IBM said Friday that it has built a supercomputer the size of a television based on microchip technology to be used in gaming consoles due out next year. IBM said the supercomputer, which can perform 2 trillion calculations per second, is a small-scale prototype of the Blue Gene/L supercomputer that it is building for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.
#1432| source: http://www.theregister.co.uk by maximum3d on Sat Nov 15 2003 
Reversible computing
Michael Frank, an assistant professor at UF, created a way to re-engineer current chip designs, letting them recycle energy typically cast off as excess heat. The idea builds on decades of work and could well be the answer to extending Moore's Law for many years to come. By reusing energy with the help of tiny oscillators added to a chip's circuity, Frank hopes to make it possible for companies such as Intel and IBM to keep coming up with more powerful products. "The long term goal of the program is to build computing devices that go through their cycle of operations just coasting from one cycle to the next," Frank said in an interview. "In the long run, reversible computing is the only thing we can do to keep pushing performance limits."
#1431| source: http://www.crn.com/ by maximum3d on Sat Nov 15 2003 
Intel Unveils More Details About Next-Gen CPU
When Montecito debuts in 2005, the processor will include 24 Mbytes of Level 3 cache memory, as well as two cores, each with multithreading capabilities. Montecito's successor, Tanglewood, will feature more than two cores. This multithread, multicore architecture enables up to 6 Mbytes of on-die cache as well as 48 Gbps of bandwidth and a 6.4-Gbps system bus. In other words, Montecito will be fast, with low-latency access to large data sets.
#1430| source: http://www.theregister.co.uk by maximum3d on Sat Nov 15 2003 
1GHz FSB Athlon 64 FX Q1 '04
SiS has begun shipping its latest Athlon 64 FX chipset, the SiS755FX - a part designed to support next year's 939-pin processors. AMD has already said it will ship 939-pin versions of the FX next year, most recently when it updated its public roadmap. However, it's less well known that the company plans to up the chip's HyperTransport bus speed. The currently available FX-51's HT bus runs at up to 1600MTps (mega-transfers per second), enough for 6.4GBps of data throughput (3.2GBps in each direction). The SiS755FX, however, can run its FSB at up to 2000MTps - or 8GBps. In other words, the future FX's will operate at 1GHz, up from today's 800MHz.
#1429| source: http://www.eet.com by maximum3d on Sat Nov 15 2003 
Next-gen DVD riven by two competing standards
There's division in the ranks of the DVD Forum, whose steering committee will meet in New York next week to vote on a next-generation optical-disk format. Sixty companies took part in the forum's technical working group to develop the high-definition (HD-DVD) format, and some of them are also members of the opposing Blu-ray Disc ROM (BD-ROM) camp. Blu-ray was developed by 10 powerful consumer electronics companies, including Sony, Philips, Hitachi, Sharp and Samsung. All 10 are members of the DVD Forum's steering committee.
#1428| source: http://www.theregister.co.uk by maximum3d on Sat Nov 15 2003 
Sony launches 0.4in thick notebook
Actually, the PCV-P101 effectively is a notebook - just one mounted with the 1280 x 768 widescreen 17in display facing the user, LCD screen-fashion. The keyboard is stored flat against the screen and folds down ready for use. Unlike a typical laptop, however, the PC's internals are mounted in the screen half of the clamshell, rather than under the keyboard. There's even an optional battery you can fit.
#1427| source: http://www.tweaktown.com by maximum3d on Sat Nov 15 2003 
Gigabyte GA-7VT600-1394 Motherboard
TweakTown take a look at the Gigabyte GA-7VT600-1394 motherboard based on VIA's KT600 chipset.

 
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